Italian Locks

Italians are known for many things.  Off the top of my head I can think of five:  food, fashion, cars, love & romance, and history – just to name a few.  Italians live life with a class and style all their own, but like every culture they have their idiosyncrasies.  The first time I saw the locks I had not clue – I thought is just looked ugly.   If you have not idea what I’m talking about, you in good company.   Most people don’t. Even I didn’t know for almost 5 years.  Until I was educated; here’s the story.

Where ever streets have picturesque views in Italy you see a chain, a guardrail full of locks.  The locks are next to and on top of each other.  It doesn’t matter, as long as they’re stationary.  Each lock has two initials and or a heart.  The tradition goes like this.  After a long  romantic walk couples usually  take a lock; Inscribe both their initials, securely fasten it to the chain.  Then throws away the key.  As if to say our love will last forever.  The Italians took carving initials into a tree a step further.  They mark their relationship in style.  It’s an incredible sight to behold when the locks blend into the Italian landscapes. As odd as this sounds it’s a more common and beautiful than one would think.  It’s one of those things that marks the Italian as a great people.  Next time you travel. Mind the locks.

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One thought on “Italian Locks

  1. Andrew Stone says:

    The BBC wrote and article on the Locks in Roma. Check it out.

    http://www.bbc.com/travel/blog/20110513-locks-say-i-love-you

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